In an ideal world, every person would be given equal opportunity to succeed. Reality, however, is taking time to catch up. As you may have observed from recent discussions, including the memorable acceptance speech delivered by Patricia Arquette during the Oscars, it seems that we still have a long way to go.

In the U.S., the Equal Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is in charge of making significant strides toward this goal. First established in the year 1964, the agency is responsible for upholding Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. Overall, the EEOC aims to make sure that cases of workplace discrimination based on their race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, gender, or sexuality are significantly diminished.

Based on Title VII and amendments made in the passing years, any instance of discrimination across all areas of employment is categorically illegal. This means that every single employee is expected to receive fair and equal treatment, whether it’s in the wages they receive or the career advancement opportunities they are awarded. It also protects employees from getting terminated based on factors discriminatory factors. The same is true even before a person is employed, as it is equally important that all applicants are considered during the hiring process.

It’s unfortunate that this has not been true for some individuals. As noted on the website of The Melton Law Firm, a significant number of employees are all too often denied their basic freedoms. Just in 2013, the EEOC received almost 93,727 cases of job discrimination with the following breakdown:

  • 38, 539 cases involved discrimination charges with retaliation;
  • 33,068 cases involved race and ethnicity;
  • 27,687 cases involved discrimination based on gender and sexuality;
  • 25,957 cases involved discrimination against persons with disabilities (PWD).

If you feel that your Title VII protection has been violated by your employer, don’t hesitate to seek legal counsel to find just compensation. A workplace should be conducive to helping individuals meet their full potential. Cases of discrimination and harassment based on race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, gender, or sexuality should not be tolerated.


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