In the blockbuster film Gone Girl (2014), the main character Amy Elliot-Dunne staged her own fake murder in order to have her husband convicted and sentenced to death after she finds out that he was cheating on her. In the movie, she says, “To fake a convincing murder, you have to have discipline.

It then begs the question – is it still really a crime if there was no actual crime committed?

This tends to me the question that most people seem to ask. Since Amy’s character staged the whole thing, is what she did still illegal? There are many underlying tones in that film and novel that point out some of the flaws in the way some mysterious crimes are investigated. One such crime that involves no actual “crime” being committed is that of conspiracy.

According to the website of the lawyers with Kohler Hart Powell, SC, conspiracy to commit a crime is still a federal offense in and of itself. Conspiracy to commit fraudulence or an assassination, for example, is something that takes considerable amount of discipline in order to plan.

However, what a lot of people don’t know is that sometimes, there is no basis for the charges being brought against you if you are being charged with conspiracy. Chances are that agents have been monitoring you, suspecting conspiracy, and they are particularly skilled with years of experience at the art of asking subtle and seemingly innocuous questions with potentially incriminating answers if you don’t know how the law works. There have been cases wherein a person unknowingly gave a testimony that was detrimental for their own situation, thereby giving them a harder time in the long run.

If you are being questioned or suspected by federal agents for conspiracy, it is recommended that you exercise your right to remain silent and to first contact an attorney before you make any sort of statement in order to give you your best chance at a fair and smooth case.


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